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Park High School

Park High School

 Welcome to the Design & Technology Department

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"British designers are celebrated all over the world for their creativity and innovation but the real strength of our industry has, and always will, lie in education."  - Sir Terence Conran

Head of Department:

Mrs Kerai

e-mail: n.kerai@parkhighstanmore.org.uk

Members of the Department:

Mrs Kerai

Ms Bartle

Miss Mistry

Mrs Maddur Rajaram

Mrs Wood

Mr Coleman

 

Key Stage 3

Design & Technology

The Design and Technology curriculum is a three-year programme on a carousel. As students’ progress through Year 7 to 9 they are given the opportunity to focus on specific aspects of the subject such as Product Design, Food Technology, Engineering, Electronics, Textiles and Graphics. However, at its core is creativity and imagination. To do this effectively, students will acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on additional disciplines such as Mathematics, Science, Computing and Art. Through a variety of creative and practical activities, students will be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making in all specialisms of Design and Technology. 

There is a spiral curriculum in which students will experience each Design and Technology discipline in the Key Stage.

 

Year 7 
 

In Year 7 students will learn the basics of health and safety in the workshop and a catering kitchen. They learn the importance of working safely and hygienically in the kitchen by practicing variety of practical skills using a range of ingredients based on the Eatwell Guide. Students will practice cooking simple dishes, enabling them to make informed decisions about food and nutrition. We explore hand stitching, using a sewing machine and applying decorative finishes on fabric to be able to offer lifelong skills to be able to sew on buttons and fastenings. 

Students are taught how to use workshop tools and machinery safely and independently. We encourage the use of CAD/CAM to make products for students to have an opportunity to understand how products are made in industry. Students will learn about input, process, and outputs, by making a key ring torch using LEDs and switches to understand simple electronic component as a base for in-depth learning in Year 8. 

Year 7 students spend 7 weeks in each rotation specialism area. Students will start their journey at any one of the following areas and experience the design and making process to gain understanding and practical skills.

Graphics Engineering Food Preparation & Nutrition Textiles Product Design CAD/CAM
(3 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks)

Stamp project.

Logo and graphic design.
Moving Toy Project Types of timbers, template and batch production.

Diet & Nutrition.

Eatwell Guide and balanced diet.

Hand stitched card.

Juggling balls.

Acrylic pen holder.

Chocolate shape and packaging.

Introduction to 2D CAD software – bookmark project.

LED keyring touch.

Knowledge Organisers:

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KS3 Assessment:

At the end of each rotation topic, each student will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are.

Home learning is allocated on a weekly basis and will inform the following lesson. It may be an isolated piece of work, a project, research, or an alternative task which challenges the students to solidify their knowledge and / or extend it.

Year 8 

In Year 8 students will extend practical skills and build upon their capabilities developed in Year 7. This also includes mechanical, electrical and computer control as student build knowledge and skill using CAD/CAM and 2D Design. Students learn to produce working drawings to build knowledge of technical drawing in industry. Students are given the opportunity to learn soldering and gain knowledge on electronic components and the application of Integrated circuits. The focus in Food, Preparation and Nutrition is on providing a healthy diet throughout our lifetime and in diverse cultures, with an introduction into Food Science. This allows students to acquire knowledge to be able to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now, and later in life. 

Year 8 students spend 7 weeks in each rotation specialism area. Students will start their journey at any one of the following areas and experience the design and making process to build their understanding and practical skills they acquired in year 7.

Graphics Engineering Food Preparation & Nutrition Textiles Product Design CAD/CAM
(3 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks) (7 weeks)

Technical drawing.

Linkage Project Levers, Linkages and motion.

Metal fabrication project- Properties and working with Metals,

Health and Provenance.

Influences on food choice.

Where food comes from.

Bag project in the style of an Art movement.

Structures.

Renewable Energy – wind turbine project.

Google Sketch up – 3D printing.

Knowledge Organisers:

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If you would like to view this content please

You have not allowed cookies and this content may contain cookies.

If you would like to view this content please

KS3 Assessment:

At the end of each rotation topic, each student will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are.


Home learning is allocated on a weekly basis and will inform the following lesson. It may be an isolated piece of work, a project, research, or an alternative task which challenges the students to solidify their knowledge and / or extend it.

Year 9
 

By the end of Key Stage 3 students will be familiar with where materials and food ingredients originate from and how they are manufactured and produced in industry. Students will be able to identify a range of issues that relate to Design and Technology and the World, include scales of production and the impact on the environment through suitability and designing for a particular need in society. Students will gain confidence in working independently and will be competent within the workshop and kitchen. This year students will go through a carousal of the GCSE disciplines we offer at GCSE. Students will experience Food, Preparation and Nutrition, Product Design with Textiles and Engineering with Electronics. Using creativity and imagination, students design and make products considering their own and

others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art throughout the year.

Year 9 students will spend 8 weeks in each rotation for a specialism area. Students will start their journey at any one of the following areas and experience the design and making process to build their understanding and practical skills to become independent, creative, and skilled individuals.

Communication skills Introduction

Food, Preparation & Nutrition   

Engineering

Textiles

Product Design

End of key stage 3

(4 weeks) (8 weeks) (8 weeks) (8 weeks) (8 weeks) (2 weeks)

Technical Drawing – drawing using boards, CAD drawings.

Dimensional drawings and exploded views.

Tie Holder  (Metals & CAD CAM)

Classic cooking skills.

Building knowledge of healthy eating, nutrition, and the consequences of a poor diet.

Master chef competition.

Wacky Racer –Designing and manufacturing with a range of materials and machinery.

Mechanisms-Crank & Cam Kinetic toy using knowledge of force, energy and motion.

 

Schematic Block Diagram analysis with soldering skills

Textiles and sustainability.

Where do our clothes come from?

 

Smart and New fabrics.

Pattern cutting, customising clothing.

Designing for a client – needs and wants.

Designing and making a wooden money box using CAD.

Iterative design project - games controller project

Review of KS3 learning.

 

End of year Assessment.
           

KS3 Assessment:

At the end of each rotation topic, each student will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in

order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are.

Home learning is allocated on a weekly basis and will inform the following lesson. It may be an isolated piece of work, a project, research, or an alternative task which challenges the students to solidify their knowledge and / or extend it.

In the Summer Term, the End of Year Assessment will be based on the content studied throughout Year 9 and the format of tests will replicate the GCSE course layout. Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential. To further support the transition, the scheme of work in year 9 begins to use more GCSE language and GCSE style questions to ensure students get used to this from an early stage.

 

Key Stage 4

Students choose their GCSE course at the end of Year 9. The range of Design & Technology GCSE syllabuses available in D&T are:

  • GCSE Design & Technology (AQA)
  • GCSE Food Preparation & Nutrition (AQA)
  • GCSE Engineering (AQA)
  • BTEC Tech Awards Engineering (Pearson)

GCSE Design & Technology

Students who opt for the GCSE D&T course follow a programme of study throughout Year 10 which builds on prior learning and more, to prepare them for controlled assessment and the 2-hour exam at the end of Year 11. Helping to reinforce this is a range of small mini-projects that change regularly to keep our students enthused. These include projects that support the theory but also allow for an opportunity to get in the workshop and explore manufacturing techniques, tools and processes alongside some design development to build an understanding of the iterative design process. As they come to the end of year 10 they start their final major project which compromises of a controlled, internally assessed portfolio which shows the development of a product fitting to a theme released by the exam board.  Students must show that they can explore and carry out suitable research, design their products, model them and justify changes and iterations before manufacturing them independently and safely.  They must show evidence of testing and an ability to critically evaluate their final prototype outcome.   

The AQA Design & Technology course is split into these areas

• Core technical principles

• Specialist technical principles

• Designing and making principles

In addition:

at least 15% of the exam will assess maths

at least 10% of the exam will assess science.

Year 10
 

Exam knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11. Students study for a GCSE in Design & Technology with a Non-Examined Assessment (coursework) project accounting for 50% of the marks. 

Topics taught in year 10

  • Designing and Making
    • Material properties and technology of wood, fabrics, metal, plastics and card.
    • Manufacturing processes, tools and equipment, rapid prototyping
    • Design Sketching and the Iterative design process *important for fully understood and developed marketable ideas
    • Investigating, Primary and Secondary data
    • The wrk of other designers and design companies
    • Design Strategies
    • Communication of ideas and prototype development
    • Workshop safe practice
  • New & emerging technologies
    • Industry and Enterprise
      • New ways of working and robots
      • Fair Trade and Co-Operatives
    • Sustainability and the Environment
    • People Culture and Society
    • Production Techniques and Systems
      • CAD CAM- 2D design Laser Cutter and 3D Printer
    • Informing Design decisions- ergonomics and anthropometrics
  • Energy Generation & Storage
  • Smart, modern, composite materials and technical textiles
  • Electronic systems, mechanisms and levers
  • Mathematics in Design & Technology
  • Common Specialist Technical Principles
    • Forces and Stresses on Materials and Objects
    • Improving Functionality
    • Ecological and Social Footprint
    • Scales f Production

Year 10 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in

order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practising for their final exams throughout this course.

In the Summer Term, each student will sit a formal, internal exam which will consist of all elements taught throughout the course.  Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential.

GCSE assessment

NEA coursework accounts for 50% of the marks of the course are started in the Summer term of Year 10. This is completed by Spring mid term of Year 11 with interim deadlines for the final completion of sections provided by the teacher. The written exam accounts for the remaining 50% of the marks. 

In the Summer Term, each student will sit a formal, internal exam which will consist of all elements taught throughout the course.  Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential.

Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in year 11. Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence.

Paper 1 Exam:

• Written exam: 2 hours

• 100 marks

• 50% of GCSE

Non-Exam Assessment (NEA):

• Non-exam assessment (NEA): 30–35 hours approx

• 100 marks

• 50% of GCSE

Examination Board :

AQA

Course Specification:

AQA Design and Technology (8552)        

Qualification obtained:

GCSE Design & Technology

Useful Websites:

Technology Student - http://www.technologystudent.com

Seneca - https://www.senecalearning.com/

BBC Bitesize - http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/

Blood Hound SSC - http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Design and technology Association - https://www.data.org.uk/

Design Technology Department - http://www.design-technology.org/

Design Technology on the Web - http://www.design-technology.info/home.htm

Innovators in Mathematics Education - http://www.mei.org.uk/

James Dyson Foundation - http://www.jamesdysonfoundation.co.uk/

Lego Education - http://education.lego.com/en-gb

Sketch Up Online - https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-for-web

 

Useful Reading Material:

Hodder Education AQA GCSE 9-1 Design & Technology ‘All Material Categories and Systems’

Collins AQA GCSE Revision All in One Practice book

PG Online AQA Design & Technology 9-1 by MJ Ross

Hodder Education AQA GCSE 9-1 Design & Technology ‘Textiles Based Materials’ Bryan Atwood et al (textiles focused)

Year 11
 

Students study for GCSE in Design and Technology, with a single controlled assessment project accounting for 50% of the marks.  Exam knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11.

In year 11 we continue with the rest of the specification

Topics taught:

  • Selecting an appropriate design concept
  • Identifying the user and their needs
  • Relevant research like materials, ergonomics, anthropometry, questionnaires
  • Writing a design brief
  • Writing a design specification
  • Creating design ideas using 3D sketching techniques with appropriate dimensioning, annotations and rendering.
  • Developing ideas on paper, CAD and making test models (iterative design process)
  • Comparing ideas evaluating potential final ideas to decide the best way forward
  • Planning and making prototypes from hard and soft materials
  • Testing and evaluating the designs with the client and making improvements and recommendations
  • Exam Revision for regular in class assessments, mock and terminal examinations
    • New and Emerging Technlogies
    • Energy, Materials, Systems and Devices
    • Origins, Prperties and working with Wood, Fabrics, Plastics, Card and Electronics
    • Designing Principles
    • Making Principles
      • Tolerances and Allowances
      • Material Management and Marking out
      • Specialist tools equipment and processes
      • Surface treatment and finishes

KS4 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in

order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practicing for their final exams.

GCSE assessment

Students will start the preparation for the Design & Technology examinations at the beginning of Year 10. The paper is not tiered which allows all students full access to the whole range of grades 9-1. The examination papers will be completed during the summer term of Year 11.

Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA. Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence.

Paper 1 Exam:

• Written exam: 2 hours

• 100 marks

• 50% of GCSE

Non-Exam Assessment (NEA):

• Non-exam assessment (NEA): 30–35 hours approx

• 100 marks

• 50% of GCSE

 

Examination Board :

AQA

Course Specification:

AQA Design and Technology (8552)        

Qualification obtained:

GCSE Design & Technology

Useful Websites:

Technology Student - http://www.technologystudent.com

Seneca - https://www.senecalearning.com/

BBC Bitesize - http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/

Blood Hound SSC - http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Design and technology Association - https://www.data.org.uk/

Design Technology Department - http://www.design-technology.org/

Design Technology on the Web - http://www.design-technology.info/home.htm

Innovators in Mathematics Education - http://www.mei.org.uk/

James Dyson Foundation - http://www.jamesdysonfoundation.co.uk/

Lego Education - http://education.lego.com/en-gb

Sketch Up Online - https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-for-web

 

Useful Reading Material:

Hodder Education AQA GCSE 9-1 Design & Technology ‘All Material Categories and Systems’

Collins AQA GCSE Revision All in One Practice book

PG Online AQA Design & Technology 9-1 by MJ Ross

Hodder Education AQA GCSE 9-1 Design & Technology ‘Textiles Based Materials’ Bryan Atwood et al (textiles focused)

 

GCSE Food, Preparation & Nutrition

Students who opt for the Food, Preparation and Nutrition GCSE course follow a programme of study throughout Year 10 which builds on prior learning and more, to prepare them for controlled assessment and the 2-hour exam at the end of Year 11. Helping to reinforce this is a range of small mini-projects that change regularly to keep our students enthused. These include projects that support the theory but also allow for an opportunity to get in the food rooms and explore and learn a range of practical skills and techniques. At the beginning of Year 11 students start their final major projects which compromises of a controlled, internally assessed portfolio which shows the development of a product fitting to a theme released by the exam board.  Students must show that they can explore and carry out suitable food preparation skills, detailed research and investigation. Students should show evidence of applying their knowledge and understanding of food in their written work and selection of dishes made.

There are 2 Non-Examined Assessments (NEA) - a Food Investigation Task and a Food Preparation Task. The Food Preparation task involves a formal practical exam showcasing three dishes. At the end of Year 11there is a formal written exam.

All students who follow this course will be given home learning weekly.  Wider reading is always useful either from the websites offered, the textbook or as directed by their classroom teacher.

Year 10 

Exam knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11.

Topics taught in year 10:

  • Food, nutrition and health
  • Food science
  • Food safety
  • Food choice
  • Food provenance
  • Developing practical skill level

Year 10 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in

order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practicing for their final exams throughout this course.

In the Summer Term, each student will sit a formal, internal exam which will consist of all elements taught throughout the course.  Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential.

GCSE assessment

Non-examined assessment (coursework) makes up 50% of the marks for the course and is  started in the autumn term of Year 10. This is completed in December of Year 11 with interim deadlines for the final completion of sections provided by the teacher. The written exam accounts for the remaining 50% of the marks. 

Students will start the preparation for the examinations at the beginning of Year 10. The paper is not tiered which allows all students full access to the whole range of grades 9-1. The examination papers will be completed during the summer term of Year 11.

The NEAs are split into 2: Food Investigation which consists of a written report and pictorial evidence of practical work, this is worth 30% of the NEA mark: Food Preparation which consists of written and pictorial evidence of planning, making and presenting 3 dishes.

Context to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA

Written exam:

1 hour 45 minutes

100 marks

50% of GCSE

Questions Multiple choice questions (20 marks)

Five questions each with a number of sub questions (80 marks)

Non-exam assessment (NEA)

Task 1: Food investigation (30 marks)

Students' understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.

Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this NEA task. Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.

Task 2: Food preparation assessment (70 marks)

Students' knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.

Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved. Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence. Photographic evidence of the three final dishes must be included.

Examination Board :

AQA

Course Specification:

AQA 8585 GCSE D&T: Food Preparation & Nutrition              

Qualification obtained:

GCSE D&T: Food Preparation and Nutrition

Useful Websites:

https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/food/gcse/food-preparation-and-nutrition-8585

www.illuminate.digital/aqafood

https://www.bbc.co.uk/food

https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/category/healthy-recipes/

https://www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/eight-tips-for-healthy-eating/

 

Useful Reading Material:

AQA Food Preparation and Nutrition by Anita Tull and Garry Littlewood

AQA GCSE Revision Food Preparation and Nutrition

Year 11 

Exam knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11.

Topics taught in year 11

  • Advanced practical skills
  • Research
  • Investigation

Year 11 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or practice NEA. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in

order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practicing for their final exams.

 

GCSE assessment

Students will start the preparation for the examinations at the beginning of Year 10. The paper is not tiered which allows all students full access to the whole range of grades 9-1. The examination papers will be completed during the summer term of Year 11.

The NEAs are split into 2: Food Investigation which consists of a written report and pictorial evidence of practical work, this is worth 30% of the NEA mark: Food Preparation which consists of written and pictorial evidence of planning, making and presenting 3 dishes.

Context to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA

Written exam:

1 hour 45 minutes

100 marks

50% of GCSE

Questions Multiple choice questions (20 marks)

Five questions each with a number of sub questions (80 marks)

Non-exam assessment (NEA)

Task 1: Food investigation (30 marks)

Students' understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.

Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this NEA task. Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.

Task 2: Food preparation assessment (70 marks)

Students' knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.

Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved. Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence. Photographic evidence of the three final dishes must be included.

Examination Board :

AQA

Course Specification:

AQA 8585 GCSE D&T: Food Preparation & Nutrition              

Qualification obtained:

GCSE D&T: Food Preparation and Nutrition

Useful Websites:

https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/food/gcse/food-preparation-and-nutrition-8585

www.illuminate.digital/aqafood

https://www.bbc.co.uk/food

https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/category/healthy-recipes/

https://www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/eight-tips-for-healthy-eating/

 

Useful Reading Material:

AQA Food Preparation and Nutrition by Anita Tull and Garry Littlewood

AQA GCSE Revision Food Preparation and Nutrition

 

GCSE Engineering

Engineering is an increasingly innovative and exciting area to work in. It affects every aspect of modern life – from skyscrapers to smart phones, cars to carrier bags. Engineering introduces students to a host of new technologies, helping them to gain practical skills and understanding to inspire a lifelong interest in engineering.

It will particularly appeal to those who enjoy being creative, with an affinity for drawing, design, maths and problem-solving. Students who opt for the GCSE Engineering course follow a programme of study throughout Year 10 which builds on prior learning and more, to prepare them for controlled assessment and the 2-hour exam at the end of Year 11. Helping to reinforce this is a range of small mini-projects that change regularly to keep our students enthused. These include projects that support the theory but also allow for an opportunity to get in the workshop and explore manufacturing techniques, tools and processes alongside some design development to build an understanding of circuits in electronic systems.

As students come to the end of year 10 they start their final major project which compromises of a controlled, internally assessed portfolio which shows the development of a product fitting to a theme released by the exam board.  Students must show that they can explore and carry out suitable research, design their products, model them and justify changes and iterations before manufacturing them independently and safely.  They must show evidence of testing and an ability to critically evaluate their final prototype outcome.   

The AQA Engineering course is split into these areas

  • Engineering materials
  • Engineering manufacturing processes
  • Systems
  • Testing and investigation
  • The impact of modern technologies
  • Practical engineering skills

The course is split in two elements

  • Non Examined Assessment (coursework) project accounting for 40% of the marks. 
  • 2 hour end of course exam accounting for 60%

In addition:

 at least 30% of this course will assess Maths

at least 10% of the course will assess Electronics Systems

Year 10 

Exam knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11. Students study for a GCSE Engineering with a Non-Examined Assessment (coursework) project accounting for 40% of the marks. 

Topics taught in year 10

•           Designing and Making

o          Material properties and technology of wood,  metal, plastics and electronics systems

o          Manufacturing processes, tools and equipment, rapid prototyping

o          Physical and CAD Modelling

Year 10 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practicing for their final exams throughout this course.

In the Summer Term, each student will sit a formal, internal exam which will consist of all elements taught throughout the course.  Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential.

GCSE assessment

NEA coursework accounts for 40% of the marks of the course are started in the Summer term of Year 10. This is completed by Spring mid term of Year 11 with interim deadlines for the final completion of sections provided by the teacher. The written exam accounts for the remaining 60% of the marks. 

In the Summer Term, each student will sit a formal, internal exam which will consist of all elements taught throughout the course.  Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential.

Examination Board :

AQA

Course Specification:

AQA Engineering 8852 

Qualification obtained:

GCSE Engineering

Useful Websites:

Technology Student - http://www.technologystudent.com

Sketch Up Online - https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-for-web

Seneca - https://www.senecalearning.com/

BBC Bitesize - http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/

Blood Hound SSC - http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Design and technology Association - https://www.data.org.uk/

Design Technology Department - http://www.design-technology.org/

Design Technology on the Web - http://www.design-technology.info/home.htm

IET Faraday - http://faraday.theiet.org/

Institution of Civil Engineers - http://www.ice.org.uk/

Institution of Engineering and Technology - http://www.theiet.org/

Institution of Mechanical Engineers - http://www.imeche.org/

Institution of Structural Engineers - http://www.istructe.org/

James Dyson Foundation - http://www.jamesdysonfoundation.co.uk/

Lego Education - http://education.lego.com/en-gb

National STEM Centre - http://www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk/

Royal Academy of Engineering - http://www.raeng.org.uk/education/

 

Useful Reading Material:

Text Book - Engineering AQA 9-1 by Paul Anderson and David Hills-Taylor  Hodder Education     ISBN : 9781510425712

Revision Book - My Revision Notes AQA GCSE (9-1)  Engineering (MRN) by Paul Anderson-  Hodder Education   ISBN: 9781510425729 

Year 11
 

Exam knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11. Students study for a GCSE Engineering with a Non-Examined Assessment (coursework) project accounting for 40% of the marks. 

In year 11 we continue with the rest of the specification

Topics taught:

  • Investigating into a context and Analysing a given problem,
  • Imagine solutions to that problem using  a range of modelling techniques including CAD
  • Relevant research like mechanisms and electronics
  • Developing design ideas that conform to sector- specific conventions using appropriate Engineering drawings
  • Producing a detailed production plan for the engineered product
  • Applying systems technology

 

KS4 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practicing for their final exams.

GCSE assessment

Paper 1 Exam:

• Written exam: 2 hours

• 120 marks

• 60% of GCSE

Non-Exam Assessment (NEA):

• Non-exam assessment (NEA): 30 hours approx

• 80 marks

• 40% of GCSE

Students will start the preparation for the Engineering examinations at the beginning of Year 10. The paper is not tiered which allows all students full access to the whole range of grades 9-1. The examination papers will be completed during the summer term of Year 11.

A brief is set annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA. Students will produce engineering drawings or schematics to communicate a solution to the brief. and an engineering product that solves a problem.

The portfolio will consist of an investigation into a context; analysis of the problem; relevant research to formulate a range of methods of solving the problem (including modelling); systems diagrams and sector-specific drawings; a final prototype that is fit for purpose, a test plan and a final evaluation.

Examination Board :

AQA

Course Specification:

AQA Engineering 8852 

Qualification obtained:

GCSE Engineering

Useful Websites:

 

Technology Student - http://www.technologystudent.com

Sketch Up Online - https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-for-web

Seneca - https://www.senecalearning.com/

BBC Bitesize - http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/

Blood Hound SSC - http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Design and technology Association - https://www.data.org.uk/

Design Technology Department - http://www.design-technology.org/

Design Technology on the Web - http://www.design-technology.info/home.htm

IET Faraday - http://faraday.theiet.org/

Institution of Civil Engineers - http://www.ice.org.uk/

Institution of Engineering and Technology - http://www.theiet.org/

Institution of Mechanical Engineers - http://www.imeche.org/

Institution of Structural Engineers - http://www.istructe.org/

James Dyson Foundation - http://www.jamesdysonfoundation.co.uk/

Lego Education - http://education.lego.com/en-gb

National STEM Centre - http://www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk/

Royal Academy of Engineering - http://www.raeng.org.uk/education/

 

Useful Reading Material:

Text Book - Engineering AQA 9-1 by Paul Anderson and David Hills-Taylor  Hodder Education     ISBN : 9781510425712

Revision Book - My Revision Notes AQA GCSE (9-1)  Engineering (MRN) by Paul Anderson-  Hodder Education   ISBN: 9781510425729 

 

BTEC Tech Awards Engineering (Pearson)

The UK is regarded as a world leader in engineering, which covers a wide range of exciting and rapidly developing areas such as renewable energy, space, low carbon, aerospace, creative industries, automotive, agri-food and bioscience. People with engineering skills are always in demand.

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/2 First Award in Engineering provides an engaging, robust, broad-based introduction to engineering. It provides underpinning knowledge, understanding and practical skills that reflect the needs of employers and higher and further education. It presents knowledge, skills and understanding in a meaningful work-related context, to allow learners to understand theory and application.

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/2 Tech Award in Engineering is for learners who wish to acquire technical skills through vocational contexts by studying mechanical, electrical/electronic and engineering design as part of their Key Stage 4 learning. The qualification recognises the value of learning skills, knowledge and vocational attributes to complement GCSEs. The qualification will broaden the learner’s experience and understanding of the varied progression options available to them.

What can the qualification lead to?

Study of the qualification as part of Key Stage 4 learning will help learners to make more informed choices for further learning either generally or in this sector. The choices that a learner can make post-16 will depend on their overall level of attainment and their performance in the qualification.

Learners who generally achieve at Level 2 across their Key Stage 4 learning might consider progression to:

  • A Levels as preparation for entry into higher education in a range of subjects
  • study of a vocational qualification at Level 3, such as a BTEC National in Engineering, which prepares learners to enter employment or apprenticeships, or to move on to higher education by studying a degree in an engineering area.

Learners who generally achieve at Level 1 across their Key Stage 4 learning might consider progression to:

  • study at Level 2 post-16 in a range of technical routes designed to lead to work, to progression to employment, apprenticeships or to further study at Level 3. For these learners, the attitudes and the reflective and communication skills covered in the qualification will help them achieve
  • study of engineering post-16 through the study of a technical certificate. Learners who perform strongly in this qualification compared to their overall performance should strongly consider this progression route that can lead ultimately to employment in engineering sector

On this course, students will:

  • Learn about the key engineering sectors – mechanics, electrical/electronic and engineering design and how they contribute to industry.
  • Develop key engineering practical and technical skills, such as research, observation, measurement, planning, making, using CAD and disassembly.
  • Develop key skills for employment in engineering sectors, such as problem solving, design, creativity, communication and collaboration.

IMPORTANT NOTE – Student must pass 5 out 5 coursework elements and succeed in the final exam to gain a qualification on this course.

Year 10
 

BTEC Engineering knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11. Students will begin their coursework after an introduction to the course.

Topics taught in year 10

Coursework

1. Exploring Engineering Sectors & Design Applications  ( Internally Assessed and accounts for  30% of the total qualification )

A. Understand engineering sectors, products and organisations and how they interrelate e.g. engine suppliers to Airbus 360.

B. Explore engineering skills through the design process e.g.  3D CAD drawing, physical model built from card or modelling compound, 3D printing

2. Investigating an Engineering Project  ( Internally Assessed and accounts for  30% of the total qualification )

A. Understand materials, components and processes for a given engineered product e.g. properties of metals and polymers, die-casting, injection moulding, soldering and brazing.

B. Investigate a given engineered product using disassembly techniques e.g  safe use of tools and equipment to remove semi-permanent fixings and learn  measurement skills using precision equipment like Vernier calliper and micrometer

C. Plan the manufacture of and safely reproduce/inspect/test a given engineered component. Learners will reproduce a component from the previously dismantled product using the same materials and making processes

KS4 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practicing for their final exams.

BTEC assessment

In the Summer Term of year 10, each student will sit a formal, internal exam which will consist of all elements taught throughout the course.  Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential.

Examination Board :

Pearson

Qualification obtained:

BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Engineering

Useful Websites:

Technology Student - http://www.technologystudent.com

Sketch Up Online - https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-for-web

Seneca - https://www.senecalearning.com/

BBC Bitesize - http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/

Blood Hound SSC - http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Design and technology Association - https://www.data.org.uk/

Design Technology Department - http://www.design-technology.org/

Design Technology on the Web - http://www.design-technology.info/home.htm

IET Faraday - http://faraday.theiet.org/

Institution of Civil Engineers - http://www.ice.org.uk/

Institution of Engineering and Technology - http://www.theiet.org/

Institution of Mechanical Engineers - http://www.imeche.org/

Institution of Structural Engineers - http://www.istructe.org/

James Dyson Foundation - http://www.jamesdysonfoundation.co.uk/

Lego Education - http://education.lego.com/en-gb

National STEM Centre - http://www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk/

Royal Academy of Engineering - http://www.raeng.org.uk/education/

 

Useful Reading Material:

BTEC Tech Award Engineering Student Book by Simon Goulden

REVISE BTEC TECH AWARD  Engineering Revision Guide by Andrew Buckenham ( Pearson)

BTEC First in Engineering Student Book  by Simon Clarke and Alan Darbyshire

Hodder Education Engineering AQA 9-1 by Paul Anderson and David Hills- Taylor

Year 11 

Students continue to study for BTEC Engineering coursework. Exam knowledge and skills are developed throughout year 10 and 11.

In year 11 we continue with the rest of the specification

Topics taught:

3. Responding to an Engineering brief  ( Synoptic External Exam which accounts for  40% of the total qualification )

(Two part exam)

Part 1 = 2 hour practical based on testing an engineering principles.

Part 2 = 90 minute written exam linked to Part 1.


 Students will be taught to explore and how to record, collect and interpret data in an engineering context. They will develop an understanding of how to interpret a brief and explore design ideas, including their viability as a final solution.

KS4 Assessment:

At the end of each topic, students will complete some form of assessment in class, which might be in the form of a written piece, presentation, or an end of topic test or assessment of a practical piece of work. Students are encouraged to assess their own work in order to help them become more aware of the progress they are making. These assessments provide a valuable insight into the progress made by each student over the topics taught. The assessments have been designed to consider all learning styles and to ensure all students can make progress, no matter what their strengths and talents are. Exam style questions and exam practice is planned into the curriculum to ensure students are practicing for their final exams.

BTEC assessment

In the Spring Term of year 11/Summer Term of year 11, each student will sit an external exam which will consist of all elements taught throughout the course.  Appropriate preparation in the form of revision should be taken seriously with sufficient planning and organisation to ensure each student fulfils their potential.

Examination Board :

Pearson

Qualification obtained:

BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Engineering

Useful Websites:

Technology Student - http://www.technologystudent.com

Sketch Up Online - https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-for-web

Seneca - https://www.senecalearning.com/

BBC Bitesize - http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/

Blood Hound SSC - http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Design and technology Association - https://www.data.org.uk/

Design Technology Department - http://www.design-technology.org/

Design Technology on the Web - http://www.design-technology.info/home.htm

IET Faraday - http://faraday.theiet.org/

Institution of Civil Engineers - http://www.ice.org.uk/

Institution of Engineering and Technology - http://www.theiet.org/

Institution of Mechanical Engineers - http://www.imeche.org/

Institution of Structural Engineers - http://www.istructe.org/

James Dyson Foundation - http://www.jamesdysonfoundation.co.uk/

Lego Education - http://education.lego.com/en-gb

National STEM Centre - http://www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk/

Royal Academy of Engineering - http://www.raeng.org.uk/education/

 

Useful Reading Material:

BTEC Tech Award Engineering Student Book by Simon Goulden

REVISE BTEC TECH AWARD  Engineering Revision Guide by Andrew Buckenham ( Pearson)

BTEC First in Engineering Student Book  by Simon Clarke and Alan Darbyshire

Hodder Education Engineering AQA 9-1 by Paul Anderson and David Hills- Taylor

 

Additional Information

 

Key Stage 5

Park High School

Thistlecroft Gardens, Stanmore,
Middlesex, HA7 1PL

Headteacher:Mrs Colette O'Dwyer

Email:info@parkhighstanmore.org.uk

Phone:020 8952 2803

Map of Park High School Location
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